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Statement:

It seems we can sometimes understand ourselves or find inner experience articulated through the language of the landscape - and in that connection recognize something within both landscape and self that is deeper and bigger than either...


Private Instruction
Presentations
Fine Art Resume pdf


BORN: NY, NY 1960

CURRENT RESIDENCE: Rochester, NY (contact: jhmott@juno.com)

EDUCATION 1985: M.F.A., Painting and Drawing
Univ. of Michigan School of Art, Ann Arbor, MI

1982: B.A., Visual Studies; Religion
Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH
cum laude, with distinction and high distinction

1995: B.S., Environmental Science
SUNY Brockport, Brockport, NY

FINE ART / LANDSCAPE PAINTING
I paint and draw in response to the visual environment - urban, suburban, rural and natural landscapes, favoring modes of representation that emphasize both sensitive observation and subjective experience of everyday surroundings.

Of note: The Itinerant Artist Project (IAP) – “exchanging art for hospitality across the USA.” Touring for a total of 9 months since 2000, I have stayed in several dozen homes in 30 states, and produced over 500 paintings of the American landscape. Integrating personal creative practice with public outreach and performance, this ongoing project has generated national and international attention. For more info: click here.

SELECTED AWARDS AND HONORS
NY State Council on the Arts Grant, 2010
NYFA Special Opportunity Stipend, 2009
NY State Council on the Arts Grant, 2002
Blue Mountain Center Guest Residency (by invitation), 2001
Saltonstall Foundation Painting Grant, 1997
Saltonstall Foundation Residency, Ithaca, NY, 1996
New York State/Monroe County LIFT Grant, 1986
First Selection, UM/Karlsruhe Fellowship for Fine Art, 1985
Marcus Heimann Award for Creative Excellence, Dartmouth College, 1982

SELECTED MEDIA AND REVIEWS
Jim Mott: Road Art 2000-2009, Rebecca Rafferty, City Newspaper 12/09
Artful Lodger, Carolyn Kylstra, Dartmouth Alumni Mag. 4/08
NBC Today Show feature: Art for Hospitality 1/2/08
Itinerant Artist, Ray Sikorski, Christian Science Monitor 10/07
Itinerant Painter, CBC Radio Interview / Radio Q, 10/07
Small Art, Giant Appeal, by Maja Tarateta, Art Business News, April 03
Coast to Coast, by Alan Singer, American Artist, Feb. 02
A Harvest of Other Views, by Jim Memmott, Democrat & Chronicle, Feb. 01
Cross Country Painter, by Rebecca Denton, Valley News (NH, VT), Jan. 01
Building the Perfect Painting, City Newspaper, Rochester, NY, Jan. 00
Spirit and Place reviewed, by John C. Cantu, Ann Arbor News, Oct. 93
Direct and Distilled Response, by Judith Reynolds, City Newspaper, Jul. 90

SELECTED SOLO AND INVITATIONAL (*) EXHIBITIONS
2009 Jim Mott: Road Art 2000-2009, Mercer Gallery, Rochester, NY
2009 American Road Artist, RACC, Rome, NY
2005 Creative Conversations*, High Falls Gallery, Rochester, NY
2003 Farmland and Development, Big Springs Museum, Caledonia, NY
2003 The Itinerant Artist Project, 1570 Gallery, Rochester, NY
2002 Here and Not Here, Mill Gallery, Honeoye Falls, NY
2001 First Year of the Itinerant Artist Project, Taylor Gallery, Meriden, NH
2000 Retrospective Exhibition, Mercer Gallery, Rochester, NY
1998 Spirit and Place, Edwards Gallery, Plymouth, NH
1996 Shadow Landscape, Matrix Gallery, Ann Arbor, MI

My art is found in private and institutional collections in the US, Canada and Europe, including the collections of the Memorial Art Gallery, film director John Irvin, and singer/songwriter Ani DiFranco.

WRITING/OTHER
I work part-time as an environmental consultant for national and local conservation groups; occasionally publish poetry, essays and articles, including "The Shadow Landscape, Painting on Black Gesso" and "Packing Ultralight for Travel Painting" in Inksmith; and am currently working on a book about my Itinerant Artist Project.

Artist's Statement

It seems we can sometimes understand ourselves or find inner experience articulated through the language of the landscape - and in that connection recognize something within both landscape and self that is deeper and bigger than either. Landscape painting is, for me, mainly part of a contemplative path and a way of making connections. It is a means by which I can explore inner and outer worlds, give substance to my appreciation of the things I see around me, and share a sense of caring and wonder with other people.

A landscape painting is a representation, to some degree a window, inviting you to see and perhaps feel something seen and felt by the painter; but it is also - and this may be a subtle shift in emphasis - a small doorway to shared experience. A painting affirms and expands a realm where the appreciation, imagination and thought of the viewer can mingle with those of the painter, with those of any other viewer, and, in a landscape painting, with the spirit of the place depicted.

When painting, however, I may feel but don't really think about these points. I tend to paint whatever's around me, often favoring the everyday stuff of common experience; I think it's important to remember that beauty and meaning are really there in the ordinary things as much as anywhere. Certain subjects or themes will catch my interest for certain reasons, often showing me a way to give form and some resolution to my own emotions. Sometimes I simply enjoy seeing and trying to understand a scene or some aspect of a scene that I happen upon.

In painting a place, I want to show something of the shapes and colors - the particular visual reality - of the chosen subject. I also try to keep the paint active and moving with a life of its own. I'm always excited when a brushstroke can suggest a cloud or a tree and also convey a certain feeling, all the while remaining a little mass of paint. The ideal I usually aim toward is the concentrated moment when subject, emotion and medium are one. I like the final image to rest somewhere between the state of painting as illusion and painting as a play of paint, just as in the process I tend to need a balance between control and not knowing what's going on.